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IMAG0160

IMAG0159

Basic guide for parents and first time riders

*This advice especially relates to children on smaller ATVs but applies equally to beginners of all ages.
*Instructing the rider. *Important advice to parents, teachers or instructors.
Your student’s safety depends on your commitment to take the time necessary to fully educate him/her on the proper operation of the ATV. Remember that proper instruction before your student begins to ride is just as important as proper instruction and supervision while riding. Please go through this manual with your student page by page. Fully explain all of the instructions, requirements and warnings it contains. Be sure to put as much emphasis on safety precautions as on proper operational techniques. Question your student as you go through the manual to ensure s/he understands what you are saying. Following is a step-by-step guide to help make your student’s first use of the ATV safe and enjoyable. Before you begin to use this guide, however, be sure you have reviewed the vehicle features and riding techniques described in the earlier parts of the manual. We strongly urges that you use this guide to teach each student whom you let ride the ATV. Be sure to take breaks as the student becomes tired or his/her attention starts to wander. Full Attention at all times is needed to safely operate any motorized vehicle, including this ATV. STEP 1: PROPER CLOTHING & PROTECTIVE GEAR The first step to safe riding is proper protection of the rider. Your student should always wear a helmet, eye protection, gloves, long pants, a long-sleeved shirt or jacket and boots. Make sure your student is not wearing any loose-fitting clothes. Loose belts, scarves, etc., can get caught in moving parts and cause personal injury. Even in hot weather, make sure the student wears long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. These not only protect against abrasive injuries but also help reduce fatigue which comes from loss of body heat caused by exposure to the wind. STEP 2: FAMILIARIZATION WITH THE VEHICLE Your student should become completely familiar with the names and functions of all controls. Demonstrate operation of the controls if necessary. Ask the student to do such things as “Apply the brakes. Turn off the engine,” etc. Practice this exercise until the student can operate all of the controls without hesitation and without looking at the controls. Review the instructions with your student until she/he knows all the items that should be checked. Give specific examples of things to look for. STEP 3: STARTING OFF AND STOPPING To help your student develop confidence, she/he should PRACTICE FIRST WITH THE ENGINE OFF, as follows:

1. Have student sit on ATV.
2. Instruct student to keep his/her eyes straight ahead while you slowly push the vehicle from behind. This will give the student the “feel” of riding a moving vehicle.
3. As you push the ATV, instruct your student to steer straight ahead and perform operations such as stopping the vehicle and turning OFF the engine switch while moving. Watch your student closely to make sure she/he is operating the controls correctly and without looking at them.
4. As you approach the end of the practice area, tell your student to stop the vehicle. You should drag the rear end of the ATV around so you can push it straight ahead in the opposite direction.
5. Practice with the engine OFF until your student gets the “feel” of using the brakes and can stop the vehicle and turn OFF the engine switch without hesitation and without looking at the controls. STEP 4: ADJUST THE SPEED LIMITER TO SLOW NOW. Next start the ATV’s engine and have the student practice starting off, riding in a straight line and stopping with the vehicle under power. Walk alongside the ATV and hold the engine cutout switch cord or have the student ride back and forth between you and another supervising adult. Make sure your student: 1. Opens the throttle gently when starting off. 2. Releases the throttle and applies the brakes in sequence when stopping. 3. Becomes aware of the distance it takes the vehicle to stop when the engine switch is turned OFF while the vehicle is moving. As you approach the end of the practice session, you should again tell the rider to stop the vehicle and get off so you can turn it around for him/her. Practice this exercise until your student can start off, accelerate, cruise and stop correctly and confidently. STEP 5: TURNING: After your student has learned to ride the ATV in a straight line and can stop it at will, you should teach the student how to turn the vehicle. Explain the proper body movements for turning and let the student PRACTICE FIRST WITH THE ENGINE OFF as you push the vehicle from behind. When turning, watch to make sure your student: 1. Shifts his/her weight slightly forward and supports his/her weight on the outer footrest. 2. Leans his/her upper body into the direction of the turn, pressing down with the opposite leg. When the rider is able to properly turn the ATV in both directions with the engine OFF, she/he should practice turning with the vehicle under power. Again, make sure that the throttle limiter is adjusted to provide a low maximum speed capability. Watch closely to make sure the rider is using the proper technique. The rider should practice turning until s/he can do so correctly and confidently. STEP 6: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER When your student has mastered the basic riding maneuvers in the previously listed steps, she/he should practice them all together. Instruct the student to perform various maneuvers such as turning right, turning left, stopping, etc. Vary the order of these maneuvers so the student will not anticipate what s/he will be asked to do next. Practice this exercise until you are confident that the rider has mastered all the basic maneuvers. Using this procedure will help the first-time rider learn the most basic riding techniques. To become a skilled rider, your student will need a great deal of practice and continuing instruction in addition to completing these introductory steps. After all the riding techniques have been mastered, you can adjust the throttle limiter to provide higher speed capabilities in keeping with the rider’s skill and experience.



1. Assembly: After vehicle assembly, do the following:

a. Ensure all nuts/bolts are securely fastened. b. Replace engine oil with a high grade blend (15-40w) or (10-40w) c. Replace sparkplug with an appropriate new NGK plug. Part #CR6-HSA 25 point ATV/motorcycle system check: Fuel System

1) Check carburetor for proper operation
2) Check for proper operation of choke
3) Check for proper operation of fuel pet-cock
4) Check for proper operation of fuel drain line
5) Check for proper operation of gas tank vent
6) Check and adjust idle set screw
7) Adjust needle if necessary (high altitude) Electrical
8) Install and check battery - fill with electrolyte if battery is not a sealed unit
9) Check fuses
10) Check all lights
11) Check ignition
12) Ensure proper operation of starter
13) Check that spark plug wire is properly installed Engine
14) Check oil for proper level and quality
15) Check cooling system for anti-freeze (only on water cooled units) Suspension
16) Check wheel bearings
17) Check and adjust suspension components
18) Check and adjust tire pressure (2-6psi and within 1lb of each other)
19) Check and adjust brakes Other
20) Check all plastic for damage
21) Check and adjust throttle cable
22) Check foot-rests
23) Test all hand and foot controls for proper operation
24) Check and adjust (and lubricate) chain
25) Check transaxle fluid level (if necessary)

2. First Service Interval – 10-15 Hours Use

a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.
b. Check all Engine/Vehicle fluid levels and ensure there are no leaks.
c. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary (initially there will be “chain stretch”).
d. Check tire pressure.
e. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.

3. 3 Month Service Interval:
a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.
b. Change Engine Oil.
c. Check and replace spark plug if necessary.
d. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary.
e. Check tire pressure/condition.
f. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.
g. Lube all fittings/chain as necessary.

4. 6 Month Service Interval:
a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.
b. Change Engine Oil and Filter.
c. Replace Spark Plug.
d. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary.
e. Check tire pressure/condition.
f. Check and adjust Valve Clearances if necessary.
g. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.
h. Lube all fittings/chain as necessary.
i. Check all Vehicle fluid levels (coolant, brake fluid, etc.)

5. 12 Month Service Interval:
a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.
b. Change Engine Oil and Filter.
c. Check and replace Spark Plug if necessary.
d. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary.
e. Check tire pressure/condition.
f. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.
g. Lube all fittings/chain as necessary.
h. Flush and replace brake fluid.
I. On water-cooled vehicles – Flush and replace coolant. Dealers/Retail End Users: Following these Manufacturer’s warranty Service Items/Intervals will help to ensure smooth, efficient and fun operation of your vehicles. NOTE: This warranty does not cover neglect, abuse, misuse or negligence or damaged parts from accidents or shipping. Warranty does not include all wearable parts including, but not limited to: brakes, tires, batteries and body parts.




Step 1: Oil is the Engine's Lifeblood ATV Racing Oil You may hear mechanics and wannabes alike claiming that oil changes are less important then ever thanks to tighter tolerances and advances in oil lubricants. While these claims may be true to a certain extent, break in is certainly not the time to experiment. Proper break-in of a new ATV engine is an essential aspect to the vehicle's longevity. The key to successful break-in is to ride the quad easy but not so mellow that the rings can’t seat within the cylinder. The best way to do this is to combine a high load with low RPM. In other words lug the engine a bit by riding smoothly in a higher gear then necessary as opposed to popping it into one gear and revving it out. The oil that comes inside your engine will be adequate for the first few hours of break in but conduct a thorough oil change immediately after. It’s not a bad idea to consider a synthetic blend even over a full synthetic. Make certain to run motorcycle or ATV specific oil blends as the yare designed to lubricate the clutch (this is known as a wet clutch) as well as the engine’s internals. Automotive oil and full synthetics may be adequate at lubing up the engine but usually lead to clutch slippage. Step 2: Lube Away ATV Chain LubeSure your ATV was greased at all of the pivots before leaving the factory but this grease is designed to withstand overseas shipping and initial break-in operation. Asking it to endure for the life of the machine is simply looking for trouble. Not to mention that all it takes is a little contact with the water from a pressure washer to blast this lubrication away. It's always a good idea to check any and all exposed bearings and pivots (swing arm linkage for example) and to apply a thick slosh of quality waterproof grease on these areas BEFORE they show signs of compromised performance. The common mistake is to wait until bearings begin to squeal or drag before paying attention to them and by then it’s almost always too late. Step 3: Chain Gang ATV ChainIt's quite normal for the quad's chain (shaft and belt drive units need not apply) to stretch a bit during those first few rides. However, just because a bit of additional slack is normal, it’s critical to check to make sure it hasn't become too loose. It's a good practice to get in the habit of keeping a small ruler in your toolbox for this specific purpose. This way, whenever you lube the chain, you can measure and jot down the amount of slack present. Your vehicle's owner’s manual will provide the proper range of movement expected before the chain will require tightening or replacement (depending on how many times you’ve tightened it before). If you find yourself in a situation where you can't access a ruler to measure the amount of slack, the rule of thumb is typically no more than two to three finger widths of vertical movement.


TIPS


PLEASE READ THESE TIPS BEFORE RIDING YOUR NEW RIDE.
YOU MUST THE FOLLOWING !!!

1. MAKE SURE EVERY NUTS AND BOLTS ARE LOCK TIGHT (BLUE COLOR).

2. AFTER 4 TO 5 HOURS DRIVING YOU MUST CHANGE THE OIL TO 10 W 40.

3. MUST INSPECT EVERYTHING BEFORE EACH RIDE.

4. CHECK TIRE PRESSURE.

5. DO NOT EXCEED ITS WEIGHT LIMIT.

7. DO NOT EXCEED ITS SPEED LIMIT.

8. BRAKE IN YOUR ATV FOR 2 WEEKS (THROTTLE VERY SLOW)

9. USE HIGHER OCTANE GAS 93

10. CHANGE YOUR REVERSE GEAR WHILE COMING TO A COMPLETE STOP.

11. ADDITION TO THESE TIPS PLEASE READ YOUR OWNER MANUAL.

12.WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY INJURY...

I HAVE READ AND EXPLAINED TERMS AND CONDITIONS.

Post Delivery Inspection

Post Delivery Inspection sheet for ATVs
Post Delivery Inspection sheet for ATVs

After vehicle assembly, do the following:

a. Ensure all nuts/bolts are securely fastened.

b. Replace engine oil with a high grade blend (15-40w) or (10-40w)

c. Replace sparkplug with an appropriate new NGK plug. Part #CR6-HSA

25 point ATV/motorcycle system check:

Fuel System

1) Check carburetor for proper operation

2) Check for proper operation of choke

3) Check for proper operation of fuel pet-cock

4) Check for proper operation of fuel drain line

5) Check for proper operation of gas tank vent

6) Check and adjust idle set screw

7) Adjust needle if necessary (high altitude)

Electrical

8) Install and check battery - fill with electrolyte if battery is not a sealed unit

9) Check fuses

10) Check all lights

11) Check ignition

12) Ensure proper operation of starter

13) Check that spark plug wire is properly installed

Engine

14) Check oil for proper level and quality

15) Check cooling system for anti-freeze (only on water cooled units)

Suspension

16) Check wheel bearings

17) Check and adjust suspension components

18) Check and adjust tire pressure (2-6psi and within 1lb of each other)

19) Check and adjust brakes

Other

20) Check all plastic for damage

21) Check and adjust throttle cable

22) Check foot-rests

23) Test all hand and foot controls for proper operation

24) Check and adjust (and lubricate) chain

25) Check transaxle fluid level (if necessary)

2. First Service Interval 10-15 Hours Use

a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.

b. Check all Engine/Vehicle fluid levels and ensure there are no leaks.

c. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary

d. Check tire pressure.

e. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.

3 Month Service Interval:

a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.

b. Change Engine Oil.

c. Check and replace spark plug if necessary.

d. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary.

e. Check tire pressure/condition.

f. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.

g. Lube all fittings/chain as necessary.

6 Month Service Interval:

a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.

b. Change Engine Oil and Filter.

c. Replace Spark Plug.

d. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary.

e. Check tire pressure/condition.

f. Check and adjust Valve Clearances if necessary.

g. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.

h. Lube all fittings/chain as necessary.

i. Check all Vehicle fluid levels (coolant, brake fluid, etc.)

12 Month Service Interval:

a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.

b. Change Engine Oil and Filter.

c. Check and replace Spark Plug if necessary.

d. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary.

e. Check tire pressure/condition.

f. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.

g. Lube all fittings/chain as necessary.

h. Flush and replace brake fluid.

I. On water-cooled vehicles

Atv Start Up Guide



How to assemble + start the Kids atv for the first time

1) Hook up battery, and assemble the rest of the unit.

2) FOR WHEEL ASSEMBLY, the wheel goes on first, then the wheel spacer (kinda pushes up underneath the hub), then flange washer, then the castle nut (finger tight), then tighten the nut down further until you can insert the cotter pin through the hole in the castle nut and the hole in the axle, Insert cotter pin.

3) use dipstick to make sure that there is enough engine oil. Mini atv use regular oil 10W30. (110cc atv=has sight glass, no dip stick). Once it is broke in, after about an hour of use, use 10w30 synthetic.

4) Loosen the bottom screw on the bottom of the carburetor to relieve the extra gas pressure. It allows the air to escape so that the gas can flow in and take its place . Then tighten this screw back up. This can often be the problem on 20% of the mini atvs that will not start.

5) do not use remote control for starting the first time. In fact we recommend that you never use the remote to start it because it drains the battery (also it takes off, idle speed makes it move when no one is on it).

6) Put gas in the gas tank. Use high 93 octane gasoline. Jets in the carb jets are very small and lower grade gasoline will clog them..

7) Make sure the throttle cable is pushed all the way into the top of the black rubber holder at the very top of the carburetor. Nut on top of the carburetor needs to be screwed down all the way down.

8)– turn on gas petcock (located on right side of carburetor, turn clockwise to on-it allows gas to fill the gas lines and the bottom of the carburator). Some models- this is not necessary because there is no gas shutoff valve=petcock.

9) put the key in the off position, then on the remote push lock and then unlock, then push lock and then unlock a second time.

10) turn key to ON. To start the unit for the first time, you must use the key to start it. In order to use the remote start, the engine MUST be hot and the fuel lines must be full (will not cold start because you need to choke it anyway, defeating the purpose of the remote start)

11) Raise the back end of the unit up and put a block under the back end. This is a good position to have it in as you make adjustments while starting.

12) Fully choke the unit. We have two different models of chokes. One has the choke on the left handle bar (horizontal movement). The other has a vertical movement choke on the left side of the carburator. This carburetor of course is up under the plastic body of the atv. To start the unit, it has to be choked (left handle bar choke- slider should be all the way to the left (fully choked), other type=Carburator choke- slider should be all the way up (fully choked)

13) For some models -Set the left hand brake (pull back on the left handle brake lever) and then push red button (kill switch) on left handle grip=THIS IS OUR #1 Problem, because if you cannot start it and you continue to give it more and more gas = Flooding the engine and running too rich which then deposits BLACK carbon deposits on your spark plug making it very hard to start in the future. For other models -Set the left hand brake (pull back on the left handle brake lever) and push red switch forward on left handle grip (rocker switch). ON black models-turn the gas shutoff (on right side of carburetor) on (lever needs to be down).

14) push starter button on left handle bar which is yellow on some models, it is a black button on other models, which is below the red kill switch.

15) when choke is on and you push the start button it will start up and almost immediately it will die. Then turn the choke off , then push start button and it will restart immediately and NOW work the throttle to keep it going while it warms up. (if you leave the choke up while running or idling you will FOUL your spark plug because you are too rich and the spark plug turns black).

16) after starting, Let it idle for 2-3 minutes.

17) Now you are ready to ride the mini atv.

18) Adjust maximum riding speed - When riding the atv, adjust the maximum speed control with the black long screw that sticks out of the right handle grip (see picture). When you loosen the screw, it increases the maximum speed, when you screw it in, it reduces the maximum speed. After adjusting the maximum speed to the desired setting, tighten the nut around the bolt tightly so that the bolt does not fall out. Also if the bolt is free to vibrate, it will change your maximum speed setting.

Basic Guide For Parent

*This advice especially relates to children on smaller ATVs but applies equally to beginners of all ages.

*Instructing the rider. *Important advice to parents, teachers or instructors.

Your student’s safety depends on your commitment to take the time necessary to fully educate him/her on the proper operation of the ATV. Remember that proper instruction before your student begins to ride is just as important as proper instruction and supervision while riding. Please go through this manual with your student page by page. Fully explain all of the instructions, requirements and warnings it contains. Be sure to put as much emphasis on safety precautions as on proper operational techniques. Question your student as you go through the manual to ensure s/he understands what you are saying. Following is a step-by-step guide to help make your student’s first use of the ATV safe and enjoyable. Before you begin to use this guide, however, be sure you have reviewed the vehicle features and riding techniques described in the earlier parts of the manual. We strongly urges that you use this guide to teach each student whom you let ride the ATV. Be sure to take breaks as the student becomes tired or his/her attention starts to wander. Full Attention at all times is needed to safely operate any motorized vehicle, including this ATV. STEP 1: PROPER CLOTHING & PROTECTIVE GEAR The first step to safe riding is proper protection of the rider. Your student should always wear a helmet, eye protection, gloves, long pants, a long-sleeved shirt or jacket and boots. Make sure your student is not wearing any loose-fitting clothes. Loose belts, scarves, etc., can get caught in moving parts and cause personal injury. Even in hot weather, make sure the student wears long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. These not only protect against abrasive injuries but also help reduce fatigue which comes from loss of body heat caused by exposure to the wind. STEP 2: FAMILIARIZATION WITH THE VEHICLE Your student should become completely familiar with the names and functions of all controls. Demonstrate operation of the controls if necessary. Ask the student to do such things as “Apply the brakes. Turn off the engine,” etc. Practice this exercise until the student can operate all of the controls without hesitation and without looking at the controls. Review the instructions with your student until she/he knows all the items that should be checked. Give specific examples of things to look for. STEP 3: STARTING OFF AND STOPPING To help your student develop confidence, she/he should PRACTICE FIRST WITH THE ENGINE OFF, as follows:

1. Have student sit on ATV.

2. Instruct student to keep his/her eyes straight ahead while you slowly push the vehicle from behind. This will give the student the “feel” of riding a moving vehicle.

3. As you push the ATV, instruct your student to steer straight ahead and perform operations such as stopping the vehicle and turning OFF the engine switch while moving. Watch your student closely to make sure she/he is operating the controls correctly and without looking at them.

4. As you approach the end of the practice area, tell your student to stop the vehicle. You should drag the rear end of the ATV around so you can push it straight ahead in the opposite direction.

5. Practice with the engine OFF until your student gets the “feel” of using the brakes and can stop the vehicle and turn OFF the engine switch without hesitation and without looking at the controls. STEP 4: ADJUST THE SPEED LIMITER TO SLOW NOW. Next start the ATV’s engine and have the student practice starting off, riding in a straight line and stopping with the vehicle under power. Walk alongside the ATV and hold the engine cutout switch cord or have the student ride back and forth between you and another supervising adult. Make sure your student: 1. Opens the throttle gently when starting off. 2. Releases the throttle and applies the brakes in sequence when stopping. 3. Becomes aware of the distance it takes the vehicle to stop when the engine switch is turned OFF while the vehicle is moving. As you approach the end of the practice session, you should again tell the rider to stop the vehicle and get off so you can turn it around for him/her. Practice this exercise until your student can start off, accelerate, cruise and stop correctly and confidently. STEP 5: TURNING: After your student has learned to ride the ATV in a straight line and can stop it at will, you should teach the student how to turn the vehicle. Explain the proper body movements for turning and let the student PRACTICE FIRST WITH THE ENGINE OFF as you push the vehicle from behind. When turning, watch to make sure your student: 1. Shifts his/her weight slightly forward and supports his/her weight on the outer footrest. 2. Leans his/her upper body into the direction of the turn, pressing down with the opposite leg. When the rider is able to properly turn the ATV in both directions with the engine OFF, she/he should practice turning with the vehicle under power. Again, make sure that the throttle limiter is adjusted to provide a low maximum speed capability. Watch closely to make sure the rider is using the proper technique. The rider should practice turning until s/he can do so correctly and confidently. STEP 6: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER When your student has mastered the basic riding maneuvers in the previously listed steps, she/he should practice them all together. Instruct the student to perform various maneuvers such as turning right, turning left, stopping, etc. Vary the order of these maneuvers so the student will not anticipate what s/he will be asked to do next. Practice this exercise until you are confident that the rider has mastered all the basic maneuvers. Using this procedure will help the first-time rider learn the most basic riding techniques. To become a skilled rider, your student will need a great deal of practice and continuing instruction in addition to completing these introductory steps. After all the riding techniques have been mastered, you can adjust the throttle limiter to provide higher speed capabilities in keeping with the rider’s skill and experience.

Checklist 1


1. Assembly: After vehicle assembly, do the following:

a. Ensure all nuts/bolts are securely fastened. b. Replace engine oil with a high grade blend (15-40w) or (10-40w) c. Replace sparkplug with an appropriate new NGK plug. Part #CR6-HSA 25 point ATV/motorcycle system check: Fuel System

1) Check carburetor for proper operation

2) Check for proper operation of choke

3) Check for proper operation of fuel pet-cock

4) Check for proper operation of fuel drain line

5) Check for proper operation of gas tank vent

6) Check and adjust idle set screw

7) Adjust needle if necessary (high altitude) Electrical

8) Install and check battery - fill with electrolyte if battery is not a sealed unit

9) Check fuses

10) Check all lights

11) Check ignition

12) Ensure proper operation of starter

13) Check that spark plug wire is properly installed Engine

14) Check oil for proper level and quality

15) Check cooling system for anti-freeze (only on water cooled units) Suspension

16) Check wheel bearings

17) Check and adjust suspension components

18) Check and adjust tire pressure (2-6psi and within 1lb of each other)

19) Check and adjust brakes Other

20) Check all plastic for damage

21) Check and adjust throttle cable

22) Check foot-rests

23) Test all hand and foot controls for proper operation

24) Check and adjust (and lubricate) chain

25) Check transaxle fluid level (if necessary)

2. First Service Interval – 10-15 Hours Use

a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.

b. Check all Engine/Vehicle fluid levels and ensure there are no leaks.

c. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary (initially there will be “chain stretch”).

d. Check tire pressure.

e. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.

3. 3 Month Service Interval:

a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.

b. Change Engine Oil.

c. Check and replace spark plug if necessary.

d. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary.

e. Check tire pressure/condition.

f. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.

g. Lube all fittings/chain as necessary.

4. 6 Month Service Interval:

a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.

b. Change Engine Oil and Filter.

c. Replace Spark Plug.

d. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary.

e. Check tire pressure/condition.

f. Check and adjust Valve Clearances if necessary.

g. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.

h. Lube all fittings/chain as necessary.

i. Check all Vehicle fluid levels (coolant, brake fluid, etc.)

5. 12 Month Service Interval:

a. Check all nuts/bolts for tightness and security.

b. Change Engine Oil and Filter.

c. Check and replace Spark Plug if necessary.

d. Check and adjust chain tension if necessary.

e. Check tire pressure/condition.

f. Check all cables/controls for proper operation.

g. Lube all fittings/chain as necessary.

h. Flush and replace brake fluid.

I. On water-cooled vehicles – Flush and replace coolant. Dealers/Retail End Users: Following these Manufacturer’s warranty Service Items/Intervals will help to ensure smooth, efficient and fun operation of your vehicles. NOTE: This warranty does not cover neglect, abuse, misuse or negligence or damaged parts from accidents or shipping. Warranty does not include all wearable parts including, but not limited to: brakes, tires, batteries and body parts.

Checklist 2


Step 1: Oil is the Engine's Lifeblood
ATV Racing Oil You may hear mechanics and wannabes alike claiming that oil changes are less important then ever thanks to tighter tolerances and advances in oil lubricants. While these claims may be true to a certain extent, break in is certainly not the time to experiment. Proper break-in of a new ATV engine is an essential aspect to the vehicle's longevity. The key to successful break-in is to ride the quad easy but not so mellow that the rings can’t seat within the cylinder. The best way to do this is to combine a high load with low RPM. In other words lug the engine a bit by riding smoothly in a higher gear then necessary as opposed to popping it into one gear and revving it out.
The oil that comes inside your engine will be adequate for the first few hours of break in but conduct a thorough oil change immediately after. It’s not a bad idea to consider a synthetic blend even over a full synthetic. Make certain to run motorcycle or ATV specific oil blends as the yare designed to lubricate the clutch (this is known as a wet clutch) as well as the engine’s internals. Automotive oil and full synthetics may be adequate at lubing up the engine but usually lead to clutch slippage.

Step 2: Lube Away
ATV Chain LubeSure your ATV was greased at all of the pivots before leaving the factory but this grease is designed to withstand overseas shipping and initial break-in operation. Asking it to endure for the life of the machine is simply looking for trouble. Not to mention that all it takes is a little contact with the water from a pressure washer to blast this lubrication away.
It's always a good idea to check any and all exposed bearings and pivots (swing arm linkage for example) and to apply a thick slosh of quality waterproof grease on these areas BEFORE they show signs of compromised performance. The common mistake is to wait until bearings begin to squeal or drag before paying attention to them and by then it’s almost always too late.

Step 3: Chain Gang
ATV ChainIt's quite normal for the quad's chain (shaft and belt drive units need not apply) to stretch a bit during those first few rides. However, just because a bit of additional slack is normal, it’s critical to check to make sure it hasn't become too loose. It's a good practice to get in the habit of keeping a small ruler in your toolbox for this specific purpose. This way, whenever you lube the chain, you can measure and jot down the amount of slack present. Your vehicle's owner’s manual will provide the proper range of movement expected before the chain will require tightening or replacement (depending on how many times you’ve tightened it before).
If you find yourself in a situation where you can't access a ruler to measure the amount of slack, the rule of thumb is typically no more than two to three finger widths of vertical movement.
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How to assemble + start the Kids atv for the first time
1) Hook up battery, and assemble the rest of the unit.
2) FOR WHEEL ASSEMBLY, the wheel goes on first, then the wheel spacer (kinda pushes up underneath the hub), then flange washer, then the castle nut (finger tight), then tighten the nut down further until you can insert the cotter pin through the hole in the castle nut and the hole in the axle, Insert cotter pin.
3) use dipstick to make sure that there is enough engine oil. Mini atv use regular oil 10W30. (110cc atv=has sight glass, no dip stick). Once it is broke in, after about an hour of use, use 10w30 synthetic.
4) Loosen the bottom screw on the bottom of the carburetor to relieve the extra gas pressure. It allows the air to escape so that the gas can flow in and take its place . Then tighten this screw back up. This can often be the problem on 20% of the mini atvs that will not start.
5) do not use remote control for starting the first time. In fact we recommend that you never use the remote to start it because it drains the battery (also it takes off, idle speed makes it move when no one is on it).
6) Put gas in the gas tank. Use high 93 octane gasoline. Jets in the carb jets are very small and lower grade gasoline will clog them..
7) Make sure the throttle cable is pushed all the way into the top of the black rubber holder at the very top of the carburetor. Nut on top of the carburetor needs to be screwed down all the way down.
8)– turn on gas petcock (located on right side of carburetor, turn clockwise to on-it allows gas to fill the gas lines and the bottom of the carburator). Some models- this is not necessary because there is no gas shutoff valve=petcock.
9) put the key in the off position, then on the remote push lock and then unlock, then push lock and then unlock a second time.
10) turn key to ON. To start the unit for the first time, you must use the key to start it. In order to use the remote start, the engine MUST be hot and the fuel lines must be full (will not cold start because you need to choke it anyway, defeating the purpose of the remote start)
11) Raise the back end of the unit up and put a block under the back end. This is a good position to have it in as you make adjustments while starting.
12) Fully choke the unit. We have two different models of chokes. One has the choke on the left handle bar (horizontal movement). The other has a vertical movement choke on the left side of the carburator. This carburetor of course is up under the plastic body of the atv. To start the unit, it has to be choked (left handle bar choke- slider should be all the way to the left (fully choked), other type=Carburator choke- slider should be all the way up (fully choked)
13) For some models -Set the left hand brake (pull back on the left handle brake lever) and then push red button (kill switch) on left handle grip=THIS IS OUR #1 Problem, because if you cannot start it and you continue to give it more and more gas = Flooding the engine and running too rich which then deposits BLACK carbon deposits on your spark plug making it very hard to start in the future. For other models -Set the left hand brake (pull back on the left handle brake lever) and push red switch forward on left handle grip (rocker switch). ON black models-turn the gas shutoff (on right side of carburetor) on (lever needs to be down).
14) push starter button on left handle bar which is yellow on some models, it is a black button on other models, which is below the red kill switch.
15) when choke is on and you push the start button it will start up and almost immediately it will die. Then turn the choke off , then push start button and it will restart immediately and NOW work the throttle to keep it going while it warms up. (if you leave the choke up while running or idling you will FOUL your spark plug because you are too rich and the spark plug turns black).
16) after starting, Let it idle for 2-3 minutes.
17) Now you are ready to ride the mini atv.
18) Adjust maximum riding speed - When riding the atv, adjust the maximum speed control with the black long screw that sticks out of the right handle grip (see picture). When you loosen the screw, it increases the maximum speed, when you screw it in, it reduces the maximum speed. After adjusting the maximum speed to the desired setting, tighten the nut around the bolt tightly so that the bolt does not fall out. Also if the bolt is free to vibrate, it will change your maximum speed setting.